Category Archives: Art

The Art of Asheville – National Geographic’s take on our Town

Discover up-and-coming painters, potters, and designers in a city that’s brimming with talent.

348s(National Geographic) Over the past decade, this row of brick warehouses and old textile mills along the French Broad River has become a creative hive, twitching with artists and makers like Copus who value deliberate, personal craftsmanship. Exploring the open studios with John Almaguer’s guided art tour shows the amazing range of talent in this city, encompassing the wrought iron objects d’art of blacksmith Zachary Noble and the expressionist animal canvases in the biscuit factory-turned-fine art gallery of painter Daniel McClendon, or the upstairs workshop of Anna Toth, whose Bow and Arrow Apparel makes women’s jeans to measure.

“Big business has capitalized on women’s insecurities,” Toth explains matter-of-factly. “We’ve been reduced to an algorithm that doesn’t fit. As a pattern maker, I find it so satisfying to make a woman feel confident and happy in her own clothing.”

Reinventing the rules is an Asheville tradition — be it visual art, cool crafts, funky music, theater, or film, Asheville is an experimental epicenter — and always has been.

Read the entire feature by Andrew Evans HERE>

BeLoved Asheville’s new gallery offers visibility to underserved artists

proud-to-be-brown-art-studio(Mountain XPress)  Currently on display in the BeLoved Gallery, Unveiling is Rise Up Studio Collective’s first exhibition at the newly renovated gallery space, on view through Friday, March 15. Featured artists, along with Bermejo and Rivera, include Adrienne Sigmon, James Gambrell, Edwin Salas Acosta, Sunni Morgan, Courtney M., Jimi Mead, Jesse Smith and Tim Clark.

The new BeLoved Gallery adjoins the Rise Up Studio Collective’s art studio and the BeLoved community space. Artists work in close proximity, sharing techniques and materials and often repurposing and reclaiming materials in ingenious ways. “We’re proving that nothing is trash, that everything can be turned into a piece of art if you have the creativity to do it,” Bermejo says. Rise Up Studio Collective repurposes and salvages materials and equipment and uses donated art supplies.

The Rise Up Studio Collective was formed in the summer of 2013 in response to the city of Asheville’s policy of confiscating and destroying artwork offered for sale in public spaces by street artists, says self-described “undercover pastor” and BeLoved community collaborator the Rev. Amy Cantrell. Cantrell saw that these artists were being denied what was often their only means of financial support and their method of sself-expression.

Read the full report by Jeannie Regan HERE>

Art Teacher Cheers Up Stressed-Out Students By Hosting ‘Bob Ross Flash Mob’ With Wigs and Paints

bob-ross-students-krbc-screenshot-324x160(Good News Network)  As a means of rewarding her hardworking students, this middle school teacher gave them the chance to experience the joy of painting – all while they were dressed as Bob Ross.

Brady Sloane is an eighth grade art teacher at Madison Middle School in Abilene, Texas. She teaches 48 students between two pre-Advanced Placement classes, and the majority of her pupils are low-income.

Sloane recently began to notice that a lot of the kids were stressed out over their workload, and she wondered how she could reward her students for their hard work and offer them a break from the stress – and that’s when she got the idea to draw some inspiration from the artistic zen master himself: Bob Ross.

Red the full story and see a video HERE>

“Blue Ridge Craft Trails” to Link WNC Artists, Studio’s, Schools and More

55420x20334-305x184(News-Herald of Morganton) The Burke Arts Council and South Mountain Arts Co-op are now featured on the Blue Ridge Craft Trails, (www.blueridgecrafttrails.com), a new website and marketing initiative developed by the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership, linking 75 craft sites across the 25 counties of western North Carolina.

“Our region is celebrated for its authentic craft traditions, one of the heritage assets recognized by Congress in forming the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area in 2003,” said Angie Chandler, BRNHA executive director. “With the new Blue Ridge Craft Trails, we want to direct more visitors to connect with our local makers.”

Over the next two years, another 125 artists, studios, craft schools and other arts organizations will be added to the website, branding western NC as a must-see destination for the best in traditional and contemporary crafts.

With curated itineraries and printed map brochures, visitors will enjoy new opportunities to visit small towns, travel back roads, meet artists, and purchase handmade crafts directly from the studio. They can also enjoy the best that western NC offers in authentic mountain music, Cherokee culture, craft breweries and savory foodways, along with outdoor activities.

Read the complete article HERE>