The Art of Asheville – National Geographic’s take on our Town

Discover up-and-coming painters, potters, and designers in a city that’s brimming with talent.

348s(National Geographic) Over the past decade, this row of brick warehouses and old textile mills along the French Broad River has become a creative hive, twitching with artists and makers like Copus who value deliberate, personal craftsmanship. Exploring the open studios with John Almaguer’s guided art tour shows the amazing range of talent in this city, encompassing the wrought iron objects d’art of blacksmith Zachary Noble and the expressionist animal canvases in the biscuit factory-turned-fine art gallery of painter Daniel McClendon, or the upstairs workshop of Anna Toth, whose Bow and Arrow Apparel makes women’s jeans to measure.

“Big business has capitalized on women’s insecurities,” Toth explains matter-of-factly. “We’ve been reduced to an algorithm that doesn’t fit. As a pattern maker, I find it so satisfying to make a woman feel confident and happy in her own clothing.”

Reinventing the rules is an Asheville tradition — be it visual art, cool crafts, funky music, theater, or film, Asheville is an experimental epicenter — and always has been.

Read the entire feature by Andrew Evans HERE>